Indian Culture-Etiquette

Indian Culture-Religion

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Indian Culture-Etiquette

It’s critical to understand the variety of Indian customs and etiquette norms. Due to the disparities in social standards across various geographies, language groupings, and religious beliefs, every community has its own interpretation of appropriate behavior. Do not hesitate to consult your Indian counterpart or, at the very least, look around you for direction if you are unclear of the appropriate behavior in a given situation.

Fundamental Etiquette

Fundamental Etiquette

It is believed that the feet are the “dirtiest” portion of the body. One should never point the soles of their feet at a deity, a temple, or another person. Aim to avoid this while you sit.

The human head is widely regarded as the most vital organ in the body. Touching someone on top of their head is regarded as impolite and inconsiderate. This is particularly true for young children, old people, religious leaders, and monuments representing deities.

Touching the feet of a religious leader, a statue of a deity, or an elder is a sign of the highest respect for them.

Never take a seat above an elder. To prevent being higher than them, if they are sat on the floor, you should do the same.

Typically, one uses both hands or their right hand to pass objects. It is customary to use the left hand just for cleaning tasks and to never pass anything with the left hand by itself.

Indians generally take a laid-back attitude toward being on time and timely. Attendees frequently arrive at events between thirty and sixty minutes after the scheduled start time. On the other hand, Indians typically respect punctuality in official settings, including significant business meetings, doctor’s visits, or other appointments.

Visiting

Visiting

Indians are proud of their extraordinary hospitality and tend to take great delight in it. In general, it is very appreciated to get compliments on your Indian counterpart’s hospitality.

It’s possible for somebody to arrive at someone’s house late. It is appropriate to arrive 15 to 30 minutes after the scheduled time.

When you go into someone’s house, take off your shoes.

A cup of chai, or spiced tea, is usually served when you go to someone’s house or occasionally when you go to a store. 

It’s common to assume that the visitor will accept the offerings made, particularly the tea. Refusing anything could be interpreted as a courteous but insincere protest. Therefore, an Indian may urge that you accept what has been presented rather than accepting your denial. This may result in uncomfortable circumstances when a visitor may feel pressured to accept the offer.

Giving the host a gift is usually appreciated even though it is not required. Typically, a token gift of chocolates or a gift for the host’s kids suffices.

When at a house of worship, there are a number of customs followed. Religions differ in certain specifics. Usually, it’s necessary to take off your shoes. Certain locations, like Jain or Hindu temples, forbid the entry of items made of leather. Certain locations could also demand head coverings from both sexes (Sikh gurdwaras) or only from females (Muslim mosques).

Asking permission to leave someone’s house is considered courteous and respectable (e.g., “It’s probably time for me to go”). This is particularly crucial if you are paying a visit to an elderly person’s home.

Eating

Eating

It’s common to eat Indian meals without utensils. As a result, there are many kinds of eating etiquette that have to do with using your hands.

Before consuming food or giving it to an Indian, wash your hands.

When feeding themselves, people typically utilize their right hand, either by using a serving spoon or their fingers to scoop.

If eating with your hands is recommended, do not use your left hand. Since the left hand is typically used for personal hygiene, it is regarded as “unclean.”

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You can expect an Indian to serve yourself, or they might fill your dish for you.

Indian cuisine can be broadly divided into two categories: northern and southern. The latter is typically far hotter.

Certain Indians might be subject to food limitations because of their spiritual beliefs. For instance, practicing Muslims in India abstain from eating pork. Many Hindus associate cows with significant religious meanings, therefore they will abstain from eating beef.

Many Indians refrain from drinking alcohol due to many factors, including their upbringing or religion (such as Buddhism or Islam). Alcohol should only be served or provided if you are positive that your Indian counterpart consumes it.

Gift Giving

You can expect an Indian to serve yourself, or they might fill your dish for you.

Indian cuisine can be broadly divided into two categories: northern and southern. The latter is typically far hotter.

Certain Indians might be subject to food limitations because of their spiritual beliefs. For instance, practicing Muslims in India abstain from eating pork. Many Hindus associate cows with significant religious meanings, therefore they will abstain from eating beef.

Many Indians refrain from drinking alcohol due to many factors, including their upbringing or religion (such as Buddhism or Islam). Alcohol should only be served or provided if you are positive that your Indian counterpart consumes it.

Certain presents are improper based on the recipient’s religion. Presents crafted from leather, for instance, can offend a Hindu. Giving pig-related gifts to someone who identifies as Muslim would be improper, such as pork or pigskin.

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